Honda CBR600 FX/FY Specs and Information (AKA CBR600 F4)

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Honda CBR600 FX
Honda CBR600 FX in red/blue

Honda CBR600 FX/FY Specs…..

The Honda CBR600 FX and FY models (also know as the CBR600 F4 outside the UK) was a fully faired, 599cc sports motorcycle produced by Honda and available for sale in the UK between 1998 and 2000.

The CBR600 FX and FY models were the last of the CBR600 range to use a carburettor for fuelling (the next model, the CBR600 F1 used a fuel injection system). The model was completely redesigned and uprated for it’s November 1998 release including new bodywork which included air intakes on either side of the front fairing (by the headlight) and a higher revving engine which was made possible by using larger valves, shorter stroke and a bigger cylinder bore.
The model had numerous other changes and upgrades including a new frame which was a twin spar aluminium frame (called a ‘diamond’ frame by Honda) which helped to make the bike 16kg’s lighter then the previous model and the engine crankcase was part of the swing arm mounting. It also benefitted from uprated rear mono shock, 43mm front forks, calipers, headlight and new spark plug caps with ignition coils built into them.

Need parts for your CBR600? Honda CBR600 spares on Amazon…

A little bit about the Honda CBR 600 F4…..

Basic model info…

Manufacturer: Honda
Model: CBR600 FX and FY (also know as F4)
CC: 599cc
Engine type: Inline 4 cylinder (4 stroke)
Years in production: 1998 to 2000
Years and registration marks (approx):
  • ‘S’ reg – 1998 / 1999 CBR600 FX
  • ‘T’ reg – 1999 CBR600 FX
  • ‘V’ reg – Sept 1999 / 2000 CBR600 FY
  • ‘W’ reg – 2000 CBR600 FY
  • ‘X’ reg – 2000 CBR600 FY

More detailed release date and model info can in the ‘Models and years’ section below

Style of bike: Sports bike
Insurance: Group 14 (of 17) – Get a cheap insurance quote from Carole Nash
Preceding model: CBR600 FW (aka F3)
Succeeded by: CBR600 F1 (fuel injected – aka F4i)

Servicing your bike? You’ll need a CBR600 F4 workshop manual…

Models and years (in the UK)

CBR600 FX (Nov 1998 to Aug 1999)…..
Frame number started: PC31A-VM1——-
Description: All new, redesigned CBR600 model. Has new twin spar, aluminium alloy ‘diamond’ frame, uprated suspension, all new engine, 4-2-1 exhaust system, ignition key immobiliser system (Honda H.I.S.S system), new fairings with air intake ducts on the sides of the front fairing.
Available colours: Red/blue, black/silver and yellow/black/blue
Price (new): £6995 for an ‘S’ reg, £6099 for a ‘T’ reg and £6099 for a ‘V’ reg
CBR600 FY (Sept 1999 to Nov 2000)…..
Frame number started: JH2PC35A-YM100001–
Description: Same as above model with new colours.
Available colours: Blue/red, black and black/yellow
Price (new): £6295 for a ‘V’ reg, £6295 for a ‘W’ reg and £6550 for an ‘X’ reg
CBR600 F4
US CBR600 F4 (colours were different for US models)

Engine and gearbox specs…..

Displacement: 599 cc
Engine type: Inline 4 cylinder
Bore×Stroke: 67×42.5mm
No. of cylinders: 4 (inclined 31 degrees from vertical)
Engine revs to (redline): 13,500 rpm

Note: Although the clocks rev gauge goes up to 15,000rpm, there is a rev limiter fitted to the bike, the engine will cut at around 13,500 revs until the revs drop down again!)

Cam shaft configuration: DOHC (double overhead cam – chain driven)
Compression ratio: 12.0:1
Cylinder compression pressure: 12.5 bar
Valves: 16 valve (4 per cylinder)
Engine dry weight (without oil and coolant): 59kg
Spark plug: NGK CR9EH-9 (x4)
Spark plug gap: 0.8 to 0.9mm
Firing order: 1 – 2 – 4 – 3
Engine oil: 10w40 API SG or higher

Note: You can use any grade oil in the CBR600 engine (mineral, semi synthetic or full synthetic). Although fully synthetic is the best and will offer the best protection for your engine, we normally recommend a semi synth as it’s a good balance between engine protection and price (we don’t recommend mineral oils in sports bike engines!). More info…

Engine oil capacity (oil only): 3 litres
Engine oil capacity (oil and filter change): 3.3 litres
Engine oil capacity (after disassembly / rebuild): 3.7 litres
Engine oil drain bolt torque: 29nm
Engine oil drain bolt location: Bottom/right side of the engine behind the fairing
Oil filter type: Canister type
Oil filter: Hiflo HF303 / Filtrex OIF006
Oil filter torque: 10nm
Oil pressure: 71 psi (@ 6000 rpm)
Cooling system: Liquid cooled
Cooling system capacity: 3.1 litres
Thermostat begins to open: 73 to 77 degrees c
Thermostat fully open: 90 degrees c
Clutch: Wet (oil immersed) multiplate clutch
Clutch hub tightening torque (center locking nut): 127nm
Clutch operation: Cable
Clutch lever free play: 10 to 20mm
Gearbox: 6 Speed manual (1st gear down, 2nd to 6th gears up, neutral between 1st and 2nd gears)
BHP: 110 bhp (@ 12,500 RPM)
Rear wheel HP: 94.1 HP at the rear wheel
Top speed (claimed): 158mph
0 to 62mph time (claimed) : 3.2 seconds
KW output: 81 KW (@ 12,500 RPM)
Torque: 65nm (@ 10,500 RPM)
Piston ring to cylinder bore clearance: New: 0.015mm / Max 0.050mm
Valve clearance (inlet): 0.20mm (+/- 0.03mm) (when cold)
Valve clearance (exhaust): 0.28 (+/- 0.03mm) (when cold)
Idle speed: 1,200rpm (+/- 100)
CBR400 F4 starter motor
CBR600 FX/FY starter motor

Final drive stuff…..

Final drive: Chain
Front sprocket: 16 teeth
Front sprocket bolt torque: 54nm
Rear sprocket: 44 teeth

Many owners have increased the bikes acceleration by using different sized sprockets. You can use a 1 tooth smaller sprocket on the front (15 teeth instead of 16), personally, I used a 2 tooth bigger sprocket on the back wheel (46 teeth instead of 44) which I found a better set up (reducing the front sprocket by 1 tooth is approx the same as increasing the rear sprocket by 3.5 teeth).
Also, I did avoid using alloy sprockets as I was forever breaking the dammed teeth off them (but I was heavy handed with the throttle!! 😀 )

Rear sprocket bolts torque: 88nm
Chain pitch/length: 525 / 110
Chain free play: 25 to 35mm
CBR600 HF303 oil filter
Honda CBR600 canister type oil filter (Hiflo HF303)

Carb, fuel and oil stuff…..

Fuel system: Carburetor
MPG: 35 to 44 miles per gallon (very approx)

There is a massive variation in MPG between users, mainly due to different riding styles and areas (e.g. city riding vs open road)

Fuel tank range: approx 120 miles

Note: The CBR600 F4 was renowned for having a terrible tank range, I once traveled 600 miles in a day on one of these and had to fill it up 5 times!! 😀

Fuel tank capacity: 18 litres
Fuel type: Unleaded petrol (91 octane grade – aka standard petrol from your local garage)
Carb type: CV (constant velocity)
Carb make: Keihin (4x)
Carb type: VP64A
Pilot screw opening: 3 turns
Carb float level: 13.7mm (+/- 0.5mm)
Fuel pump flow: 700cm3 per minuite
Throttle grip free play: 2 to 6mm
Engine oil: 10w40 API SG or higher
Engine oil capacity (oil only): 3 litres
Engine oil capacity (oil and filter change): 3.3 litres
Engine oil capacity (after disassembly / rebuild): 3.7 litres
Engine oil drain bolt torque: 29nm
Engine oil drain bolt location: Bottom/right side of the engine behind the fairing
Oil filter: Hiflo HF303 / Filtrex OIF006
Oil filter type: Canister type
Oil filter torque: 10nm
CBR600 FX/FY exhaust
CBR600 FX/FY exhaust downpipes – These are aftermarket 4-2-1 headers (hence the lack of balance pipes between the down pipes)

Electric stuff…..

Ignition type: Electronic CDI
Starter: Electric start
Electrical system voltage: 12 volts
Battery voltage (fully charged): 13 to 13.2 volts
Battery amps per hour: 8 a/h
Battery will need charging if below: 12.3 volts
Battery charging current (normal): 0.9 amps on a 5 to 10 hour charge
Battery charging current (quick – NOT recommended!): 4.0 amps on a 1 hour charge
Regulated voltage: 14 to 15 volts (@ 5000 rpm)
Alternator output (max): 28.5 a/h (@ 5000 rpm)
Magneto / flywheel tightening torque: 103nm
Spark plug: NGK CR9EH-9 (x4)

Note: Honda did recommend that owners in colder climates (with average temperatures below 5 degrees C / 41 degrees F) should use a CR8EH-9 spark plug.

Spark plug gap: 0.8 to 0.9mm
Spark plug tightening torque: 12nm
Spark plug ignition: 4 x combined spark plug cap and coil

This model was the 1st CBR600 to use a spark plug cap with a built in ignition coil and did away with the separate coils found on older models.

Spark plug coil peak voltage: 100 volts (minimum)
Battery: CTX9-BS / YTX9-BS / CBTX9-BS

Notes:

  • The YTX9-BS battery is a 12 volt, 8 amp/hour battery and is length: 151mm width: 87mm height: 106mm in size (more info…).
  • The 1st letter(s) of the battery reference code are a manufacturers reference mark and may vary between different battery makes (different battery manufacturers use different 1st letters), so CTX9-BS, YTX9-BS and CBTX9-BS are all the same battery just from different manufacturers (more info…).
  • Also…… I would personally recommend avoiding buying the cheapest of the cheap type batteries online as they have a horrendous failure rate (and they can be a bug!er to post back when it fails as Royal Mail and alot of couriers won’t accept batteries now).
Immobiliser: Honda HISS system (Honda Ignition Security System)

Note: Be very careful if your buying one of these with the key missing or a damaged lock. This model came with 2 keys and Honda would allow the owner to buy 3 more using a code, after which the whole ignition system had to be replaced (to the tune of around £1500 in the late 1990’s!). The HISS system comprised of the key with a transponder in it, immobiliser receiver (in the ignition switch), immobiliser light (in the clocks – not 100% sure if you’d have to replace these) and was connected to the bikes ECU, all these parts would have to be replaced if the key was lost and a new one couldn’t be obtained.
Although, I have heard the US CBR600 F4 models didn’t have the HISS system so it was cheaper to buy the uncoded replacement parts from the USA?

Cooling fan switch starts to close (turns the fan on): Between 98 and 102 degrees C
Cooling fan switch open (turns the fan off): Between 93 and 97 degrees C
Bulb, light and fuse info…
Headlight high/low beam: 12 volt / 60/55 watt (1x)
Rear light / brake light: 12 volt / 21/55 watt (2x)
Indicator light: 12 volt / 21 watt (4x)
Instrument lights (on the clocks): 12 volt / 1.1 watt (3x)
Indicator lights (on the clocks): 12 volt / 1.1 watt (2x)
High beam indicator (on the clocks): 12 volt / 1.1 watt (1x)
Neutral indicator (on the clocks): 12 volt / 1.1 watt (1x)
Oil pressure indicator (on the clocks): 12 volt / 1.1 watt (1x)
Main fuse (located off the + battery terminal): 30 amp
Sub fuses: 10 amp (x4)
CBR600 F4 battery
1998 to 2000 Honda CBR600 battery (YTX9-BS)

Shocks, brakes and wheel specs…..

Front wheel type: 3 spoke wheel
Front tyre size: 120/70-17
Front tyre pressure: 36psi (2.5 bar)
Front wheel spindle torque: 59nm
Front wheel spindle clamp bolt torque: 22nm
Rear wheel type: 3 spoke wheel
Rear tyre size: 180/55-17
Rear tyre pressure: 42psi (2.9 bar)
Rear wheel spindle torque: 93nm
Front brake: Twin hydraulic disc brake with 4 piston calipers
Front brake caliper bolt tightening torque: 30nm
Front brake disc: 2x 296mm discs. Part no: EBC MD1014X (2x, same part no for left and right disc)
Front brake disc bolt torque: 20nm
Front brake pad: EBC FA296 (2 x, same pads for both left and right sides)
Rear brake: Single hydraulic disc brake
Rear brake disc: Single 220mm disc. Part no: EBC MD1004
Rear brake disc bolt torque: 42nm
Rear brake caliper bolt torque: 30nm
Rear brake pad: EBC FA174
Brake fluid (front and rear): DOT 4 brake fluid
Front suspension: Telescopic forks
Front fork stanchion diameter: 43mm
Front fork pinch bolt torque (top): 23nm
Front fork pinch bolt torque (bottom): 39nm
Front fork cap torque: 23nm
Steering stem nut torque: 103nm
Recommended fork oil: 10w (medium weight) fork oil
Fork oil volume: 475 cm3 (per fork)
Rear Suspension: Single rear shock (monoshock) with remote reservoir
Rear shock mounting nut torque: 44nm
Shock arm to swing arm nut torque: 44nm
Shock link to bracket nut torque: 44nm

Weights, measures ‘n stuff…..

Overall length: 2060mm
Overall width: 685mm
Overall height: 1130mm
Wheelbase: 1395mm
Seat height: 810mm
Footpeg height: 360mm
Ground clearance: 135mm
Dry weight (no oils, fluids etc): 170kg
Loaded weight (with oils, fluids etc): 198kg
Max weight carrying capacity (rider, pillion and luggage): 189kg

Useful torque settings…..

Cam cover: 10nm
Camshaft sprocket: 22nm
Camshaft holder bolt: 12nm
Timing hole cap: 18nm
Magneto / flywheel: 103nm
Cylinder head bolt: 47nm
Cylinder head cover bolt: 10nm
Clutch hub (center locking nut): 127nm
Spark plugs: 12nm
Front brake disc bolt torque: 20nm
Rear brake disc bolt torque: 42nm
Front wheel spindle: 59nm
Front wheel spindle clamp bolt: 22nm
Rear wheel spindle: 93nm
Front brake caliper bolt: 30nm
Rear brake caliper bolt: 30nm
Front fork pinch bolt (top): 23nm
Front fork pinch bolt (bottom): 39nm
Front fork cap: 23nm
Steering stem nut torque: 103nm
Rear shock mounting nut: 44nm
Shock arm to swing arm nut: 44nm
Shock link to bracket nut: 44nm
Engine oil drain bolt: 29nm
Oil filter: 10nm
Oil pressure switch: 12nm
Front sprocket bolt: 54nm
Rear sprocket bolts: 88nm
Side stand pivot bolt: 10nm
Rider footpeg hanger bolt: 26nm
Pillion footpeg hanger bolt: 26nm
CBR600 FX yellow/black
1999 CBR600 FX in yellow, black and blue

Service stuff…..

Servicing your bike? You’ll need a CBR600 FX/FY workshop manual…
Engine oil
Engine oil change frequency: Every 12,000km (approx 7,456 miles) or 12 months
Engine oil: 10w40 API SG or higher

Note: You can use any grade oil in the CBR600 engine (mineral, semi synthetic or full synthetic). Although fully synthetic is the best and will offer the best protection for your engine, we normally recommend a semi synth as it’s a good balance between engine protection and price (we don’t recommend mineral oils in sports bike engines!). More info…

Engine oil capacity (oil only): 3 litres
Engine oil capacity (oil and filter change): 3.3 litres
Engine oil capacity (after disassembly / rebuild): 3.7 litres
Engine oil drain bolt torque: 29nm
Engine oil drain bolt location: Bottom/right side of the engine behind the fairing
Oil filter: Hiflo HF303 / Filtrex OIF006
Oil filter torque: 10nm
Chain drive
Final drive chain frequency: Now repeat after me… ‘I MUST LUBE MY CHAIN LITTLE AND OFTEN!!’
Chain and sprocket size: 110/525 Chain, 16 tooth front and 44 tooth rear sprocket
Front sprocket bolt torque: 54nm
Rear sprocket bolts torque: 88nm
Hydraulic brake system (front and rear)
Brake fluid check frequency: Check every 12 months or 6,000km (approx 3,728 miles)
Brake fluid change frequency: Change every 24 months or 18,000km (approx 11,185 miles)
Brake fluid: DOT 4 brake fluid
Fork oil
Front fork oil check frequency: Check every 12,000km (approx 7,456 miles) or 12 months
Recommended fork oil: 10w (medium weight) fork oil
Fork oil volume: 475 cm3 (per fork)
Cooling system
Coolant check frequency: Check every 12,000km (approx 7,456 miles) or 12 months
Change every: 36,000 km (approx 22,369 miles) or 24 months
Cooling system: Liquid cooled
Cooling system capacity: 3.1 litres
CBR600 F4 brake
Honda CBR600 F4 front brake caliper and disc

Frame number location…..

The frame number is usually stamped onto the right side of the headstock (the front part of the frame just below the handle bars).

Useless stuff…..

Middleweight sports bike from Honda that was heavily redesigned for the November 1998 release to compete with Kawasaki’s ZX6R Ninja and the much newer and radical Yamaha YZF-R6. Although it was no real competition to the Yam R6, the CBR600 was a good, solid all round sports bike that was both good for a quick weekend blast or a long few weeks touring round Europe.
The new CBR600 was 16kg lighter then the previous model which was achieved, among other things, by a new designed frame. European models were also fitted with the Honda H.I.S.S system (Honda Ignition Security System) which was an factory fitted immobiliser system.
The model was dedicated by Honda to Dirk Vandenberg and Josef Boyd who were Honda R and D senior product developers for this model and were killed during the final testing.

Performance wise, even by modern standards it’s a quick bike. Although it didn’t quite have the racing image of the Yamaha R6 or the ‘bad boy’ image of the ZX6R Ninja or the GSXR600 it still easily kept up and beat most of the competition (I had one in the late 1990’s the dated ZX6R’s and Gixxer 600’s couldn’t keep up with it!). They were also used in stock 600cc racing series.
The main things that set the CBR600 apart were Honda reliability (I covered 55,000 miles in one in 2 years, missed most of the services and it only broke down once, which was totally my fault as I went through a deep puddle and got water in the airbox!! 🙁 ), and, unlike other bikes that had you clutching your backside after 25 miles it was comfortable, you could ride 300 miles and/or ride all day on one.
The only thing that really let it down was the stupidly small tank range (around 120 miles…. 110 if ridden hard!) which meant if you were doing alot of miles you couldn’t stray too far from a petrol station!

The bike had a claimed 110bhp, which worked out to about 94hp at the rear wheel, 0 to 62 time of 3.2 seconds and a top speed of around 158mph (it will actually do this….. so I’ve heard!).
Performance parts were readily available as there were loads of these models sold and, you could get more specialist parts (rear sets, racing cam’s etc) due to the bike being used for racing.
I had a few subtle / low key performance mods on mine as I wanted to keep the bike able to be ridden all day so I used a 2 tooth bigger sprocket on the rear wheel, Harris performance race can (one of the best if you can still find one!), a stage 1 Dynojet kit and a K and N air filter. This got rid of the flat spot, increased the acceleration (although I did lose a bit of top end speed) and sounded amazing with the end can 🙂
Braking wise the bike was a fairly good stopper as standard, the 4 piston front calipers had the stopping power to keet you out of trouble. Improvements could be made by fitting braided hoses and HH pads to the front.

Buying advice…..

Firstly, if your thinking of buying one always HPI check it (there’s still loads about so no point risking getting stuck with a lemon!).
Good, solid bike from Honda. There were 1000’s sold so there are still plenty about. Mileage isn’t really anything to worry about as long as it’s had oil and filter changes and the cam chain has been changed at the service intervals (if the cam chain snaps it’ll destroy the engine!).

There are quite a few ex racers around. Due to a harder lifestyle on the track they can have lots of niggling little faults and because there are alot of these bikes about, it might be better getting a non raced example if you have the money (racing bikes can often be spotted by drilled sump plugs and other bits).

Also, people have reported the Honda HISS immobiliser systems failing. This could prove expensive as the system is connected to the ignition and ECU. Apparently, US models didn’t have this system so people did buy key, ignition switch and ECU sets used from the USA (but I don’t know if this is true or not?).

They were built to take a reasonable knock as well, so lightly damaged bikes aren’t a problem (although fairings will be difficult to source now as the bike is 17 odd years old). Also, if you buy one with the original rear shock and brake hoses, these will probably be due for replacement.
The standard exhaust systems were mild steel and did rot (nothing unusual, just the effects of time and weather!). But, replacement exhaust headers, link pipes and cans of dubious stainless steel quality are readily available for not much ££’s (exhaust downpipes can be bought for under £200).

Sources / Thanks to:

CBR600F article on Wikipedia
EBC brakes
Silkolene for the service info

If you’ve got any questions or useful comments or suggestions please feel free to leave them below 🙂

Disclaimer: The information on this page is correct to the best of our knowledge. But the info should NOT be taken as 100% accurate as we can, occasionally make mistakes!

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